Land Rover LRX Grill Detail

Land Rover’s recent track record when it comes to moving concept vehicles into production is quite consistent. The Range Stormer became the Range Rover Sport, technologies from the Land Rover Land_e concept are in use on current production models, the Land Rover LRX lost its hybrid powertrain when it became the Range Rover Evoque but otherwise transitioned mostly intact, and the current Defender Concept 100 will replace the short-wheelbase Defender in 2015. In the first part of this article, we’re taking a brief look at the Land Rover DC100 and the LRX. In Part 2, we’ll look at the Land_e and the Range Stormer

DC100 and DC100 Sport (2011)

DC100 and DC100 SportOver the past few months we have written extensively about the DC100 and DC100 Sport concepts. The concepts are slated to replace the current short-wheelbase Land Rover Defender in 2015. The concepts were released as a pair at the Frankfurt Auto Show and have since made appearances at the 2011 LA Auto Show, the Dubai International Auto Show, and at Auto Expo 2012 in India.

Over the four months since their unveiling in Germany, opinions on the DC100 and DC100 Sport have been deeply divided. Land Rover’s DC100 Facebook gallery has drawn over 800 comments; most of them less than enthusiastic about the new look (to say it diplomatically). For our part, the hardtop DC100 has grown on us, while the DC100 Sport roadster… not so much. 

Since the Defender Concept 100 is indeed a concept vehicle, it’s loaded with technologies that may or may not make it into the production version. Some of the technologies include roof-mounted solar panels; a portable all-in-one touchscreen instrument panel, navigation system, audio system, and climate control center; automatic Terrain Response; on-demand spiked tires; Intelligent Terrain Mapping; and the Wade Aid sonar system that aids with water crossings.

Speaking of production, Land Rover confirmed in mid-November that the Defender Concept 100 will go into production and the company will “actively explore” bringing the new Defender to the U.S. market. You can read much more about the Land Rover DC100 here.

DC100 and DC100 Sport Rear View

Land Rover LRX (2008)

Land Rover LRXIntroduced in January of 2008, the Land Rover LRX was the genesis of the Range Rover Evoque. Unlike many concept vehicles in an industry that loves to wow car buyers with amazing concepts that get watered down into banal transportation appliances, the Land Rover LRX made the transition from concept to production vehicle remarkably intact. It also happened to be the first Land Rover developed under Gerry McGovern, Land Rover’s current design director.

Under the skin, the LRX featured a 2.0-liter turbodiesel-hybrid powertrain that was bio-diesel ready. This hybrid powertrain was estimated to deliver 60 miles per gallon while reducing CO2 emissions to 120 g/km. Unfortunately, this powertrain did not make it into the production Evoque, which in the U.S. uses a 2.0-liter turbocharged gasoline engine. Land Rover’s first production hybrid will be the Range Rover Sport derived Range_e

You can click here to read more about the Land Rover LRX and its evolution into the Range Rover Evoque. You will also be able to view a larger gallery of LRX images on that page.

Land Rover LRX Front View

Part 2: Land Rover Land_e and Range Stormer



Enter Your Email:

January 17, 2012

RoverGuide

Articles, DC100 Concept, EV & Hybrid, Range Rover Evoque

Concept, DC100, Land Rover LRX

Related Posts

Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept Video Roundup
04/16/2014

Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept Video Roundup

There is about 10 minutes worth of official video that covers the Discovery Vision Concept reveal, the partnership with Virgin Galactic, building the concept (always fun videos), the interior, the Remote Control Drive system, and more.

Read Story
Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept Interior Gallery
04/16/2014

Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept NCC-1701 Interior

The interior of the Land Rover Discovery Vision Concept looks a lot like the bridge of the J.J. Abrams' USS Enterprise NCC-1701 reboot. This can be either a good or a bad thing, depending on how much of a Star Trek geek you happen to be.

Read Story